potterswheeezy:

Harry Potter Film Concept Art by Adam Brockbank (x)

17,834 notes

algodemierda:

De paseito por la siti.

algodemierda:

De paseito por la siti.

(Source: bane-chilewebeo)

631 notes

Yoink! moments from The Simpsons

(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours)

6,497 notes

xgames:

Hollywood coming in hot! The cast of “Point Break” shut down Teahupoo for a private session on one of the biggest days of the year. Check out the photos and more at XGames.com 

Photo by Ted Grambeau

xgames:

Hollywood coming in hot! The cast of “Point Break” shut down Teahupoo for a private session on one of the biggest days of the year. Check out the photos and more at XGames.com

Photo by Ted Grambeau

79 notes

finofilipino:

RMMBR: Prueba ocular.

finofilipino:

RMMBR: Prueba ocular.

(Source: elguindilla)

2,418 notes

Donkey Kong Country: Animal Budies [x]

- Por petición

861 notes

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Heqet (Heket)
A goddess of childbirth and fertility, depicted as a frog, or a woman with the head of a frog. According to one tradition, she was the wife of Khnum, the creator god of Abu (Elephantine). He created each person on his potter’s wheel, and she breathed life into them before they were placed in their mother’s womb. Pregnant women wore amulets depicting Heqet for protection, and during the Middle Kingdom ritual ivory knives and clappers inscribed with her name were used to ward off evil during childbirth. She could also bring on labour and offer protection during labour. 
Heqet was depicted as a frog because, to the Egyptians, the frog was a symbol of life and fertility, since millions of them were born after the annual inundation of the Nile.

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Heqet (Heket)

A goddess of childbirth and fertility, depicted as a frog, or a woman with the head of a frog. According to one tradition, she was the wife of Khnum, the creator god of Abu (Elephantine). He created each person on his potter’s wheel, and she breathed life into them before they were placed in their mother’s womb. Pregnant women wore amulets depicting Heqet for protection, and during the Middle Kingdom ritual ivory knives and clappers inscribed with her name were used to ward off evil during childbirth. She could also bring on labour and offer protection during labour. 

Heqet was depicted as a frog because, to the Egyptians, the frog was a symbol of life and fertility, since millions of them were born after the annual inundation of the Nile.

1,046 notes